Restart bind after updating zonefile

You follow the convention of encoding the date in the DNS serial number, but have made a mistake: instead of 2011012400 you have set it to 2111012400.You want to correct this error without disrupting the normal operation of the zone (and in particular, without causing ).This behaviour was never RFC-compliant, and is no longer supported by BIND.

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If there is a nameserver missing at root level, add the missing nameserver to your domain registrar.

If the nameserver missing at domain level, add the nameserver to the zone file of the domain and update all your secondary nameservers.

However it is possible to achieve the same outcome by performing two separate additions.

The following procedure allows any desired serial number to be reached: Each time the serial number is changed you must reload the zone into the master nameserver, then wait for it to propagate to all of the slaves.

Before I proceed with this article, the following are the MOST IMPORTANT points you should remember as otherwise you wouldnt understand bit. An A Record must ALWAYS contain IP address (map host to IP) Whenever you specify A record it must contain IP address on the Right side. A nameserver which gives non-authoritative answer is usually called 'LAME'. An example of lame delegation is ns1.is configured to have zone information about domain but ns2.was not configured properly and does not have any information about the domain.

The A record is so important in DNS without which the meaning of mapping hostnames to IP would be absurd. Every domain must have atleast 2 nameservers and if i ask each of them, and if they have domain zone information, I will get authoritative answer. So ns1 will answer authoritatively wheras ns2 won't which will be 'lame' until it is set up properly.I am not sure how many would know that when somebody types a domain name in IE/firefox, the browser forwards the DNS request asking for ip address from the resolver of ISP (ISP Provider) and the resolver contacts the root servers and then systematically retrieves the IP address within a matter of few milliseconds. Glue records are A records that are associated with NS records to provide "bootstrapping" information to the NS records nameserver.Understanding DNS and its working is one of the most difficult computer engineering subject and yet most experienced network administrators struggle in this topic when it comes to DNS zone file writing. (see RFC 1912 section 2.3) In the above example we are mapping each NS records to IP address (A record) thus binding nameservers to IP (that is glue them).If this happens then you will need to repeat the entire process from the beginning.An alternative method is to: It should then fetch a fresh copy of the zone, regardless of serial number.Although there is nothing wrong in it, it is advisable not to have any stealth nameservers both at root level and in your dns server.

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